Дани ДеВито

Дани ДеВито

Danny DeVito
Роден в: Ню Джързи, САЩ
Рожден ден: 17.11.1944
Who would ever have guessed that this short, frazzle-haired actor-best known to TV lovers as the cheerfully malevolent troll Louie De Palma on "Taxi" (197883)-would become not only a big-screen star in his own right but a respected director as well? It seemed unlikely, but this dynamic, homuncular talent has done so (even if his 1992 biopic Hoffa was both a critical and commercial disappointment). A student at New York's American Academy of Dramatic Arts, DeVito in his salad days acted anywhere he could, even taking a part in what became an awardwinning NYU student film, Hot Dogs for Gauguin directed by future Hollywood filmmaker Martin Brest. He made his "mainstream" film debut with a small part in the 1972 Sophia Loren starrer Lady Liberty and appeared in Scalawag and Hurry Up, or I'll Be 30 (both 1973) before joining the talented ensemble cast of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975), registering strongly as one of Jack Nicholson's fellow mental patients. DeVito subsequently worked in The Van (1976), The World's Greatest Lover (1977), Goin' South (1978, again with Nicholson), Going Ape! (1981, an inept comedy starring "Taxi" costar Tony Danza), and Terms of Endearment (1983) before really tickling moviegoers with a scene-stealing supporting role in the Michael Douglas-Kathleen Turner romp, Romancing the Stone (1984). That same year, he made his directorial debut with the TV movie The Ratings Game in which he also starred with his actress wife, Rhea Perlman. After finishing Johnny Dangerously (1984), he was reunited with Douglas and Turner for a Stone sequel, Jewel of the Nile (1985). DeVito brought his trademark lunacy to Head Office and Ruthless People (both 1986), then directed his first theatrical feature, Throw Momma From the Train (1987), in which he played the childish, murder-minded son of a domineering mother. It was an auspicious big-screen effort with a distinctive visual style. He played an amoral salesman in Tin Men (also 1987) and the libidinous brother of Arnold Schwarzenegger in Twins (1988) before wielding the megaphone again, this time on The War of the Roses (1989), a devilishly funny (and often tasteless) black comedy about a divorcing couple played by old friends Douglas and Turner. On familiar histrionic turf as a ruthless Wall Street predator, DeVito starred in Other People's Money (1991) before appearing-in grotesque makeup-as the villainous Penguin in Batman Returns (1992). DeVito and Jack Nicholson teamed once again for Hoffa (also 1992), a lavish, fanciful biopic that generated more ink than coin. This time, the visual flamboyance that had served him well in Throw Momma From the Train and The War of the Roses seemed overbearing, particularly in light of an underwritten script. An avid laser-disc fan, DeVito prepared his own "special edition" of Roses and planned ahead of time for similar treatment of Hoffa DeVito also starred in Jack the Bear (1993), Junior (reteamed with Arnold Schwarzenegger) and Renaissance Man (both 1994); in addition, through his production company, Jersey Films, DeVito executive-produced Pulp Fiction (1994) and coproduced Reality Bites (1994) and Get Shorty (1995, in which he also acted).

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